Cost vs. Value Report: Exterior Products, Manufactured Stone Veneer Deliver Leading ROI

Versetta Stone in Ledgestone Mission Point

Manufactured stone once again has shown its ability to recoup homeowners’ remodeling investment. According to the Remodeling 2021 Cost vs. Value Report, an annual study by Remodeling magazine, manufactured stone veneer offers a 92.1% return on investment. That ROI is second only to garage door replacement.

The Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report compares the average costs of 22 remodeling projects with the value those investments will retain at resale. The study looked at the cost recouped from replacing a 300-square-foot band of vinyl siding from the bottom third of a home’s front façade with manufactured stone veneer (such as Boral Building Products’ Versetta Stone), sills, corners, and address block.

Manufactured stone veneer’s place in the study is slightly down from 2020, where it reached No. 1 with an ROI of 95.6%. Still, manufactured stone was 20 percentage points higher than the third project on the list, minor kitchen remodel.

Along with manufactured stone and garage doors, exterior products dominated the top of the Remodeling 2021 Cost vs. Value Report list, claiming 11 of the top 12 spots: fiber cement siding replacement (69.4% cost recouped); vinyl window replacement (68.6%); vinyl siding replacement (68.3%); wood window replacement (67.4%); wood deck addition (67.4%); steel entry door replacement (65.0%); composite deck addition (63.2%); fiberglass grand entrance (60.9%); and asphalt shingle roof replacement (60.7%).

“The trend of exterior replacements outperforming larger discretionary remodeling projects has been accelerated, no doubt, by a year in which COVID has made people reluctant to have contractors inside their homes, but yearning to improve outdoor spaces,” the Remodeling editors said. “It’s been a year when we’d expect decks to reign supreme, but the data doesn’t track what’s most popular. The Cost vs. Value report tracks the ratio of value over cost for 22 common remodeling projects, and in that ratio lies the rub: Material costs, especially for decking and pressure-treated framing lumber, went through the roof in 2020, bringing down the return despite the project’s value.”

Manufactured Stone Delivers Most ROI in Two Regions

Manufactured stone maintains a similar level of ROI when broken down geographically, with 90% or more of cost recouped across all regions. In two regions, however, manufactured stone came out on top: West North Central (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri), with 94.1% ROI, and South Atlantic (Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida), with 94.1% ROI.

See the full study and evaluation of trends at www.costvsvalue.com.

(Remodeling 2021 Cost vs. Value Report: © 2021 Zonda. Complete data from the Remodeling 2021 Cost vs. Value Report can be downloaded free at www.costvsvalue.com.)

Fine Homebuilding House Remodel Transforms 80-Year-Old New England Home

Each year, Fine Homebuilding magazine constructs a new home, showcasing the latest building science techniques and best practices for exceptional quality, comfort, and style. For 2021, they’re switching things up with their first remodel, transforming an 80-year-old Greenwich, Conn., house with a deep energy retrofit and a dramatic modernization of exterior style and interior layout.

2021 Fine Homebuilding House prior to its remodel and deep energy retrofit.
The Fine Homebuilding house prior to the remodel.

“The Fine Homebuilding editors believe this house has important lessons to offer,” the publication explains. “The existing home was built in the early decades of the 20th century and was remodeled with an addition about 20 years ago. Transforming the layout and look of this traditionally styled, shingled house to a modern home with a much more open floor plan and a Scandinavian-inspired aesthetic will provide design insights as well as lessons about framing, trim, and plumbing. Because the new homeowners have placed a priority on turning the house into a high-performance home, we’ll also get to see how the team tackles air-sealing, insulation, and mechanical systems to reach net-zero energy with Passive House performance.”

On the exterior, the home is clad in TruExterior Shiplap siding, installed vertically with some horizontal boards on the gables, and finished with Benjamin Moore’s Glacier White paint for a perfect Modern Farmhouse look. TruExterior also was used for the porch ceiling, in the reversible Shiplap-Nickel Gap siding profile with the smooth finish.

A rendering of the 2021 Fine Homebuilding House project, which includes TruExterior Siding
A rendering of the post-remodel Fine Homebuilding House.

“It’s very easy to install,” says the project’s builder, Albert Jensen-Moulten. “It cuts and glues just like wood.”

Several walls feature Eldorado Stone masonry veneer installed over a fluid-applied weather-resistive barrier. Other exterior details include a standing-seam metal roof, metal triple-pane windows, Hemlock-wrapped porch beams, and Kebony wood lintels.

Take a tour of the exterior cladding details via an interview with Jensen-Moulten and the architect, Elizabeth DiSalvo:

Follow along with the Fine Homebuilding House to learn more about the highly efficient building techniques, from air barriers to double-stud walls, on the show home’s website.

Cost vs. Report: Manufactured Stone Brings Largest Return on Investment Among Remodeling Projects

Remodeling 2020 Cost vs. Value Report

Remodelers and homeowners seeking the biggest bang for their buck will find it with manufactured stone veneer, according to the Remodeling 2020 Cost vs. Value report.

The annual Cost vs. Value Report examines which remodeling projects deliver the highest perceived return in resale value. In 2020, manufactured stone (such as Boral Building Products’ Versetta Stone), was the retrofit project with the highest ROI at the national level—95.6%, an increase from 94.9% last year. The only other project with an ROI in the 90% range was garage door replacement, coming in second at 94.5%.

The 95.6% ROI for manufactured stone is based on replacing a 300-square-foot continuous band of existing vinyl siding from the bottom third of the street-facing façade with manufactured stone veneer, sills, corners, and address block, along with outlining the entry archway and adding a keystone and a soldier course on either side.

Manufactured stone also offered the highest ROI of all categories in five out of nine regions: Pacific (Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California), with a whopping 119.5% return; Mountain (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico), with a 100.0% return; South Atlantic (Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida), at 94.0%; West South Central (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana), at 91.1%; and East North Central (Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio), at 88.0%.

Exterior Facelifts Continue to Deliver

As with the 2019 report, the 2020 Cost vs. Value study found that exterior projects dominated all others, capturing nine of the top 10 spots for ROI. Following manufactured stone and garage door replacement, those projects comprised fiber cement siding replacement, vinyl siding replacement, vinyl window replacement, wood deck addition, wood window replacement, steel entry door replacement, composite deck addition, and asphalt roofing replacement. Only minor kitchen remodels ranked as high, at 77.6%.

“The reason for high returns on exterior projects, and especially façade facelifts, stems from the valuations set by the real estate community,” Remodeling reported. “In order to make the best use of the Cost vs. Value tool, a remodeler has to think like a real estate broker. ‘Curb appeal’ and ‘first impressions’ are central to a real-estate professional’s estimation of resale value. Granted, a home’s exterior will only persuade potential buyers to see more, and first impressions can vary from one individual to the next. But the impact these impressions make is critical in setting the stage for what a buyer is willing to pay for a home.”

To read more analysis and see results, including those broken down to metro area, visit the Remodeling 2020 Cost vs. Value portal on Remodeling’s website.

Cost vs. Value Report note: © 2020 Hanley Wood, LLC. Complete data from the Remodeling 2020 Cost vs. Value Report can be downloaded free at www.costvsvalue.com.

Restoring a Porch to Its Gothic Glory

When Marc Brahaney, owner of Lasley Brahaney Architecture & Construction, began remodeling his own home, an 1870s Gothic Revival, he knew preserving its unique character would be essential. In an article in a recent issue of The Journal of Light Construction, Brahaney detailed how he meticulously restored the home’s front porch to its original design using TruExterior poly-ash material.

Gothic porch restoration with Boral TruExterior

“From the outset, I knew replicating the porch’s original moldings and trim would be a challenge; some of the Gothic-inspired shapes I needed were fairly large and chunky,” Brahaney told the magazine. “Reproducing them from rot-resistant wood (plastic products were not an option) would be difficult and expensive, so I reached out to Keith Coleman of DURATION Moulding & Millwork. Duration specializes in milling and siding from Boral [TruExterior] stock (a poly-ash material resistant to both moisture and termites). … After speaking with Keith, I concluded that milled Boral would be the best product to use, both for durability and to match the home’s unique trim work.”

Gothic porch restoration, before-and-after columns

DURATION crafted numerous elements of the porch using Boral TruExterior, including the columns, pilasters, decorative scroll work, crown, custom fascia, and dentil fascia. DURATION’s expertise in creating historically accurate profiles ensured the house maintained its landmark status while upgrading to a more durable material.

Elsewhere on the home, DURATION Moulding & Millwork also fabricated massive 5- to 6-inch window sills and two-piece casing to replicate the home’s original window trim.

Gothic porch restoration, Boral TruExterior columns

DURATION Moulding & Millwork works exclusively with TruExterior. The material offers workability similar to wood, providing versatility to produce or replicate nearly any standard and custom design. Its authentic appearance ensures an accurate look suitable for even the most discerning historical projects.

To learn more about Brahaney’s and DURATION’s approach to this unique remodel, read the Journal of Light Construction article here.

Learn more about TruExterior Siding & Trim here.

Two Simple Updates Give 1960s Ranch Home a Dashing New Look

Boral Building Products Vantage board-and-batten shutters

When lifestyle blogger Maggie Kern bought her 1960s ranch home in Charlotte, N.C., its old red-orange brick and rotting teal shutters simply didn’t suit her style. “I like everything clean and simple with a Boho flair to it,” she says. With an active toddler underfoot, Kern needed a fast, easy fix that better fit her aesthetic. To freshen up the façade, she paired new shutters and paint in a pretty mix.

A Clean Slate
To create a light, modern underlay, Kern, the blogger behind Polished Closets, first had the home’s entire exterior painted white. “With a white background, you can change up the accessories to keep a simple feel with added interest,” she says. Classic black dresses up the ironwork and gutters while also creating contrast. The deep emerald green of the front door was inspired by the color of her grandmother’s door when she was growing up.

A tried-and-true Southerner, Kern wanted shutters both to keep to the local architectural aesthetic and to infuse a pop of personality. “I think shutters add a cool design detail to any house—they can really change the look and feel,” she says.

Though most of their neighbors had open-louver or raised-panel styles, she and her husband, Neil, chose pre-colored Vantage board-and-batten shutters with spacing. “It’s fun to peek through the boards and see the [home’s] paint underneath,” Kern says.

Made of easy-care PVC with a wood-grain effect, the shutters shouldn’t crack, peel, or fade. “I already have too many things to maintain in my life—this is one less thing to worry about,” she says.

Painless Process
From start to finish, the work took a week. Professional painters from Beyond the Paint in Waxhaw spent three days prepping and painting the exterior. The next Saturday, Kern had the shutter company help with the shutters, though she was able to do most of the installation herself.

Since the shutters were surprisingly lightweight, Kern lifted them into place to align with the brickwork. She then drilled holes through the shutters and into the mortar between the bricks, hammered in matching fasteners, and hung the shutters. “It was so easy,” she says. Putting up nine sets of shutters took just a few hours.

Seamless Style Throughout
Inside the home, black accents, flashes of emerald, and a clean, airy white palette happily harmonize with the exterior. “It looks nice and clean and modern outside, then you walk in and it feels the same,” Kern says. Warm wooden furniture beckons people to sit a spell, cats Gracie and Olive lounge lazily in sunny spots, and tall plants wave their fronds pleasantly at guests.

Kern house before the remodel.

The End Result
These days the house presents a crisp and cheerful face to the street. “It now makes a good first impression,” Kern says. The paint gleams and, thanks to their durable material, the shutters still look bright. “It’s always the details that make a whole look come together. And the shutters were the perfect finishing touch.”

Cost vs. Value Report: Manufactured Stone Veneer, Siding Projects Offer High Returns

Remodelers and homeowners can once again count on exterior stone and siding to provide a solid return on investment, according to Remodeling magazine’s 2019 Cost vs. Value report.

An annual survey released in January, the Cost vs. Value report provides insights into which remodeling projects deliver the highest perceived return in resale value. Manufactured stone veneer, such as Boral Versetta Stone® stone siding, continues to be a safe bet, with a 94.9% recoup of investment at the national level. Though this is a small drop from last year, manufactured stone veneer ranks second-highest in ROI, after garage doors.

Boral Versetta Stone manufactured stone veneer Cost vs. Value report
Manufactured stone veneer, such as Versetta Stone in this Ledgestone profile, offers the second-highest return on investment for remodeling projects.

The 94.9% ROI for manufactured stone veneer is based on replacing a 300-square-foot continuous band of existing vinyl siding from the bottom third of the home’s front façade and replacing it with adhered manufactured stone veneer, sills, corners, and an address block, along with an entry archway with keystone and soldier course of flats on each side.

As in 2018, manufactured stone veneer offered the highest returns in the Pacific region (Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, and Hawaii), at 110.4%. Returns were also particularly high in the East South Central region (Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky), at 107.7%.

Manufactured stone veneer offered the highest ROI out of all categories in the East South Central, South Atlantic (91.4%), West North Central (93.5%), and West South Central (98.3%) regions.

Exterior Investments Deliver Biggest Paybacks

Siding overall finished strongly, as well, with a fifth-best return on investment at 75.6%, just shy of the 76.7% recoup in 2018. In fact, out of the 10 projects with the highest returns, nine were exterior categories, including a wood deck addition, steel entry door replacement, vinyl window replacement, a fiberglass grand entrance, wood window replacement, and a composite deck addition.

“The reason for high returns on exterior projects, and especially façade facelifts, stems from the valuations set by the real-estate community. … ‘Curb appeal’ and ‘first impressions’ are central to a real-estate professional’s estimation of resale value,” Remodeling says. “The impact these impressions make is critical in setting the stage for what a buyer is willing to pay for a home.”

What’s more, projects like kitchen and bathroom renovations tend to be  more individualized, which can mean some buyers may not like the look.

The overall percentage of investment recouped across all categories on average decreased slightly year over year. The magazine attributes the decline to the sharp increase in material costs over the summer, including those driven by tariffs.

To read more analysis and see results down to metro area, visit the Remodeling 2019 Cost vs. Value portal on Remodeling’s website.

Manufactured Stone, Siding Replacement Deliver High Returns for Remodels

For remodelers and homeowners looking to maximize return on investment, manufactured stone veneer is a safe bet, according to the Remodeling 2018 Cost vs. Value report. In the annual study, materials such as Boral Versetta Stone® offered 97.1% payback on investment at the national level, second only to garage doors. Exterior facelifts overall also proved high in value.

Published in January, the Cost vs. Value report is an annual survey from Remodeling magazine that offers insights into which remodeling projects deliver the highest perceived return in resale value.

The measurement for manufactured stone veneer is based on replacing a 300-square-foot continuous band of vinyl siding from the bottom third of the front of the home and replacing it with manufactured stone veneer, sills, corners, and an address block. This year’s 97.1% perceived ROI is an increase over 2017’s report, where the material offered an 89% return.

On a regional level, manufactured stone veneer offered the highest returns, of 125.5%, in the Pacific region (Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, and Hawaii).

Versetta Stone, Manufactured Stone Veneer, Mortarless Stone Veneer, Ledgestone
Versetta Stone mortarless stone veneer in the Ledgestone texture and Plum Creek color.

Overall, exterior projects are paying off, as well. “Except for the minor kitchen remodel, work done on the exterior of the house generated higher returns than did interior renovations,” the magazine stated.

Indeed, exterior projects made up seven of the 10 projects with the highest returns. Among those was siding replacement, which took the fifth spot with a national average of 76.7% cost recoup, up just a hair from 2017’s report.

Regionally, the Pacific again posted higher returns in the siding category, at 86.6%. ROI was also above average in the South Atlantic (82.2%) and New England (80.2%) regions.

Other highlights from the report:

  • Compared to previous years, upscale and large projects declined in value. “Growing concerns nationwide about affordability could be leading real estate pros to question moves that would make a house even more expensive at resale than it is now,” the magazine speculated.
  • Overall, average payback of the 20 common projects in 100 major markets declined, from 57.9% to 56.8%. Remodeling magazine attributes this to rising costs across all 20 projects versus values increasing in just two-thirds of the projects. The magazine expects that trend to continue this year, with high demand from hurricane and fire recovery keeping prices higher.
  • As indicated in the two siding categories above, tech regions in the West, where inventory is low and housing prices have skyrocketed faster than national averages, are reporting higher returns than most others. “Real estate professionals in Silicon Valley rated 17 of our 20 projects as likely to generate more in resale value than project cost if the home where the work occurred was sold within a year,” Remodeling said. “The same was true for 12 projects in San Francisco and the North Bay market of Santa Rosa and for six projects in Seattle.”

Ready to help your customers get more value out of their remodel? Learn more about Versetta Stone mortarless manufactured stone veneer and TruExterior Siding & Trim.

To read more analysis and see results down to metro area, visit the Remodeling 2018 Cost vs. Value portal on Remodeling’s website.